Nature Based Work by Nairobi Convention

The Western Indian Ocean region ranks as one of the most biodiverse in the world. From the rich biological reservoir that is the Northern Mozambique Channel to the unique coastal ecosystems supporting endangered marine life to the scores of species found nowhere else on earth, this biodiversity is intrinsic to human lives, economies, and health…

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Let it flow: improving water quantity and quality in Tanzania’s Rufiji river basin

Water, essential to all life, plays a particularly important role in the lives of Tanzanians living near Mbarali River, part of the larger Rufiji River basin in southern Tanzania. Here, farmers use water from the river to irrigate their crops. Cattle herders guide their animals to its banks to drink and graze.  Fishers make a living catching fish from its waters. Still…

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Nairobi Convention Marine and Coastal News Round-Up in the Western Indian Ocean (24th – 28th February 2020)

Welcome, Nairobi Convention Member States, partners, and friends, to this installment of the Weekly News Round-up! Please keep reading to find out what’s new in efforts to protect, conserve and develop the Western Indian Ocean (WIO) region. We look forward to continuing our work with you to create a prosperous WIO region with healthy rivers,…

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Saving Mozambique’s seagrass

Creating the conditions for sustainable seagrass restoration in Maputo and Inhambane bays  “People can’t think of Inhaca without thinking about seagrass,” says Salamao Bandeira of Maputo’s Eduardo Mondlane University, knee-deep in the shallow waters on the seaward side of Maputo Bay, as he points at the shores of Inhaca Island. Nearby, residents are submerged waist-deep in the sea, taking advantage of the…

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